Welcome to TestAdda

Please wait....

Loading
REET LV 2 English T1
|
Mark For Review

When Learners are engaged in a pair activity, taking on roles of a doctor and a patient, the activity is called

|
Mark For Review

Essay on long writing tasks especially on a discursive issue should

|
Mark For Review

A teacher, Amrita, uses various tasks such as creating charts, graphs, drawing, gathering information and presenting them through pair or group work. This differentiated instruction

|
Mark For Review

Which of the following is not an appropriate tool for Formative Assessment?

|
Mark For Review

Which of the following is not an objective question?

|
Mark For Review

Which of the following is feature of progressive education?

|
Mark For Review

In a diverse classroom, learners find if difficult to speak and write good English and often lapse into their mother tongue because

|
Mark For Review

Read the two sentences given below
The lizard ate the fly.
The fly ate the lizard.
A teacher can use this example to explain that

|
Mark For Review

She arrived at home and she found her son missing'

|
Mark For Review

When a test item expects the learners to use tense forms, voice, connectors, prepositions and articles accurately, such as approach can be called

|
Mark For Review

What is a poem called whose first letters of each lines spell out a word?

|
Mark For Review

He is rich but he is not happy.' is a

|
Mark For Review

The most effective tool to assess values and attitude of learners is

|
Mark For Review

A play can be best taught by

|
Mark For Review

In learnig a new language, multilingualism is

|
Mark For Review

Which is a lexical word?

|
Mark For Review

Use of dialogues and avoding unnecessary details pertain to 

|
Mark For Review

A good summative assessment should have which of the following qualities?

|
Mark For Review

To create and sustain interest in learning

|
Mark For Review

Directions : Read the poem given below and answer the questions that follow by selectiong the most appropriate option 

Night 

The sun descending in the west,
The evening star does shine;
The birds are silent in their nest,
And I must seek for mine.

The moon, like a flower,
In heaven's high bower,
With silent delight
Sits and smiles on the night.

Farewell, green fields and happy groves,
Where flocks have took delight,
Where lambs have nibbled, silent moves
The feet of angels bright;

Unseen they pour blessing,
And joy without ceasing,
On each bud and blossom,

And each sleeping bosom.
They look in every thoughtless nest,
Where birds are covered warm;
They visit caves of evey beast,
To keep them all from harm.

If they see and weeping
That should have been sleeping,
They pour sleep on their head,
And sit down by their bed.

Question : The evening star rises when

|
Mark For Review

Directions : Read the poem given below and answer the questions that follow by selectiong the most appropriate option 

Night 

The sun descending in the west,
The evening star does shine;
The birds are silent in their nest,
And I must seek for mine.

The moon, like a flower,
In heaven's high bower,
With silent delight
Sits and smiles on the night.

Farewell, green fields and happy groves,
Where flocks have took delight,
Where lambs have nibbled, silent moves
The feet of angels bright;

Unseen they pour blessing,
And joy without ceasing,
On each bud and blossom,

And each sleeping bosom.
They look in every thoughtless nest,
Where birds are covered warm;
They visit caves of evey beast,
To keep them all from harm.

If they see and weeping
That should have been sleeping,
They pour sleep on their head,
And sit down by their bed.

Question : Here, 'bower' represents

|
Mark For Review

Directions : Read the poem given below and answer the questions that follow by selectiong the most appropriate option 

Night 

The sun descending in the west,
The evening star does shine;
The birds are silent in their nest,
And I must seek for mine.

The moon, like a flower,
In heaven's high bower,
With silent delight
Sits and smiles on the night.

Farewell, green fields and happy groves,
Where flocks have took delight,
Where lambs have nibbled, silent moves
The feet of angels bright;

Unseen they pour blessing,
And joy without ceasing,
On each bud and blossom,

And each sleeping bosom.
They look in every thoughtless nest,
Where birds are covered warm;
They visit caves of evey beast,
To keep them all from harm.

If they see and weeping
That should have been sleeping,
They pour sleep on their head,
And sit down by their bed.

Question : The poet compares Moon to 

|
Mark For Review

Directions : Read the poem given below and answer the questions that follow by selectiong the most appropriate option 

Night 

The sun descending in the west,
The evening star does shine;
The birds are silent in their nest,
And I must seek for mine.

The moon, like a flower,
In heaven's high bower,
With silent delight
Sits and smiles on the night.

Farewell, green fields and happy groves,
Where flocks have took delight,
Where lambs have nibbled, silent moves
The feet of angels bright;

Unseen they pour blessing,
And joy without ceasing,
On each bud and blossom,

And each sleeping bosom.
They look in every thoughtless nest,
Where birds are covered warm;
They visit caves of evey beast,
To keep them all from harm.

If they see and weeping
That should have been sleeping,
They pour sleep on their head,
And sit down by their bed.

Question : The angels come down on Earth to 

|
Mark For Review

Directions : Read the poem given below and answer the questions that follow by selectiong the most appropriate option 

Night 

The sun descending in the west,
The evening star does shine;
The birds are silent in their nest,
And I must seek for mine.

The moon, like a flower,
In heaven's high bower,
With silent delight
Sits and smiles on the night.

Farewell, green fields and happy groves,
Where flocks have took delight,
Where lambs have nibbled, silent moves
The feet of angels bright;

Unseen they pour blessing,
And joy without ceasing,
On each bud and blossom,

And each sleeping bosom.
They look in every thoughtless nest,
Where birds are covered warm;
They visit caves of evey beast,
To keep them all from harm.

If they see and weeping
That should have been sleeping,
They pour sleep on their head,
And sit down by their bed.

Question : Birds nest is described as 'thoughtless' because

|
Mark For Review

Directions : Read the poem given below and answer the questions that follow by selectiong the most appropriate option 

Night 

The sun descending in the west,
The evening star does shine;
The birds are silent in their nest,
And I must seek for mine.

The moon, like a flower,
In heaven's high bower,
With silent delight
Sits and smiles on the night.

Farewell, green fields and happy groves,
Where flocks have took delight,
Where lambs have nibbled, silent moves
The feet of angels bright;

Unseen they pour blessing,
And joy without ceasing,
On each bud and blossom,

And each sleeping bosom.
They look in every thoughtless nest,
Where birds are covered warm;
They visit caves of evey beast,
To keep them all from harm.

If they see and weeping
That should have been sleeping,
They pour sleep on their head,
And sit down by their bed.

Question : The figure, if speech use in the line 'In heaven' s high bower' is

|
Mark For Review

Direction : In these question you have a brief passage with multiple questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Passage – 1

At this stage of civilisation, when many nations are brought in to close and vital contact for good and evil, it is essential, as never before, that their gross ignorance of one another should be diminished, that they should begin to understand a little of one another's historical experience and resulting mentality. It is the fault of the English to expect the people of other countries to react as they do, to political and international situations. Our genuine goodwill and good intentions are often brought to nothing, because we expect other people to be like us. This would be corrected if we knew the history, not necessarily in detail but in broad outlines, of the social and political conditions which have given to each nation its present character.

Q. According to the author of 'Mentality' of a nation is mainly product of its

|
Mark For Review

Direction : In these question you have a brief passage with multiple questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Passage – 1

At this stage of civilisation, when many nations are brought in to close and vital contact for good and evil, it is essential, as never before, that their gross ignorance of one another should be diminished, that they should begin to understand a little of one another's historical experience and resulting mentality. It is the fault of the English to expect the people of other countries to react as they do, to political and international situations. Our genuine goodwill and good intentions are often brought to nothing, because we expect other people to be like us. This would be corrected if we knew the history, not necessarily in detail but in broad outlines, of the social and political conditions which have given to each nation its present character.

Q. The need for a greater understanding between nations

|
Mark For Review

Direction : In these question you have a brief passage with multiple questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Passage – 1

At this stage of civilisation, when many nations are brought in to close and vital contact for good and evil, it is essential, as never before, that their gross ignorance of one another should be diminished, that they should begin to understand a little of one another's historical experience and resulting mentality. It is the fault of the English to expect the people of other countries to react as they do, to political and international situations. Our genuine goodwill and good intentions are often brought to nothing, because we expect other people to be like us. This would be corrected if we knew the history, not necessarily in detail but in broad outlines, of the social and political conditions which have given to each nation its present character.

Q. The character of a nation is the result of its

|
Mark For Review

Direction : In these question you have a brief passage with multiple questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Passage – 1

At this stage of civilisation, when many nations are brought in to close and vital contact for good and evil, it is essential, as never before, that their gross ignorance of one another should be diminished, that they should begin to understand a little of one another's historical experience and resulting mentality. It is the fault of the English to expect the people of other countries to react as they do, to political and international situations. Our genuine goodwill and good intentions are often brought to nothing, because we expect other people to be like us. This would be corrected if we knew the history, not necessarily in detail but in broad outlines, of the social and political conditions which have given to each nation its present character.

Q. According to the author his countrymen should

|
Mark For Review

Direction : In these question you have a brief passage with multiple questions following the passage. Read the passage carefully and choose the best answer to each question out of the four alternatives.

Passage – 1

At this stage of civilisation, when many nations are brought in to close and vital contact for good and evil, it is essential, as never before, that their gross ignorance of one another should be diminished, that they should begin to understand a little of one another's historical experience and resulting mentality. It is the fault of the English to expect the people of other countries to react as they do, to political and international situations. Our genuine goodwill and good intentions are often brought to nothing, because we expect other people to be like us. This would be corrected if we knew the history, not necessarily in detail but in broad outlines, of the social and political conditions which have given to each nation its present character.

Q. Englishmen like others to react to political situations like

TestAdda OMR